To introduce this seminar we’ve had a fair few powerpoints on the subject and it seems that a lot of it has to do with long exposure. Frankly, I’m not that interested in the majority of long exposure images. However, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s ‘Theaters’ series I can relate to. If anything it has shown me that with regards to the moving image I am much more fascinated by those with strong connections to the cinema itself - be it the space of the cinema, films as apposed to videos or just how the gaze theory alone is considered. 
In my humble and potentially limited opinion I find the majority of long exposure work to typically capture a landscape or in it’s own right ‘beautiful’ scenery but honestly that does not seem to engage me in anyway bar finding the image ‘nice’ or ‘attractive’. Sugimoto’s work however has taken the subject of a whole film and reduced it to a singular image. This could be done in many ways, by selecting a particular iconic screen shot for example, yet what makes Sugimoto’s ‘screen shot’ interesting is that it is the whole film condensed into one singular image and the outcome is ultimately blank. 

To introduce this seminar we’ve had a fair few powerpoints on the subject and it seems that a lot of it has to do with long exposure. Frankly, I’m not that interested in the majority of long exposure images. However, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s ‘Theaters’ series I can relate to. If anything it has shown me that with regards to the moving image I am much more fascinated by those with strong connections to the cinema itself - be it the space of the cinema, films as apposed to videos or just how the gaze theory alone is considered. 

In my humble and potentially limited opinion I find the majority of long exposure work to typically capture a landscape or in it’s own right ‘beautiful’ scenery but honestly that does not seem to engage me in anyway bar finding the image ‘nice’ or ‘attractive’. Sugimoto’s work however has taken the subject of a whole film and reduced it to a singular image. This could be done in many ways, by selecting a particular iconic screen shot for example, yet what makes Sugimoto’s ‘screen shot’ interesting is that it is the whole film condensed into one singular image and the outcome is ultimately blank.